Reformed Churchmen

We are Confessional Calvinists and a Prayer Book Church-people. In 2012, we remembered the 350th anniversary of the 1662 Book of Common Prayer; also, we remembered the 450th anniversary of John Jewel's sober, scholarly, and Reformed "An Apology of the Church of England." In 2013, we remembered the publication of the "Heidelberg Catechism" and the influence of Reformed theologians in England, including Heinrich Bullinger's Decades. For 2014: Tyndale's NT translation. For 2015, John Roger, Rowland Taylor and Bishop John Hooper's martyrdom, burned at the stakes. Books of the month. December 2014: Alan Jacob's "Book of Common Prayer" at: January 2015: A.F. Pollard's "Thomas Cranmer and the English Reformation: 1489-1556" at: February 2015: Jaspar Ridley's "Thomas Cranmer" at:

Wednesday, November 19, 2014

19 November 1190 A.D. Baldwin of Exeter—42nd of 105 Archbishops of Canterbury

19 November 1190 A.D.  Baldwin of Exeter—42nd of 105 Archbishops of Canterbury

Mr. Aveling says this is the 39th while we say he is the 42nd ABC.  He must have miscounted or dumped a few that the bishop of Rome disliked.  We’ll see, in time, if the mystery can be resolved.

Aveling, Francis. "Baldwin of Canterbury." The Catholic Encyclopedia. Vol. 2. New York: Robert Appleton Company, 1907.  Accessed 16 May 2014.

Thirty-ninth Archbishop, a native of Exeter, date of birth unknown; d. 19 Nov., 1190. He was ordained priest and made archdeacon by Bartholomew, Bishop of Exeter. He subsequently became a Cistercian monk at the Abbey of Ford, in Devonshire, and within a year was made Abbot of Ford. In 1180 he was promoted to the Bishopric of Worcester and in the same year was elected to the primatial see by the bishops of the province. The election was disputed by the monks of Canterbury, who chose first the Abbot of Battle, then Theobald, Cardinal-Bishop of Ostia. King Henry II interfered. Baldwin, who, according to Gervase, refused to accept the archbishopric unless he was elected by the monks, was installed, and an arrangement was entered into by which, in the future, the bishops' elections were to be disallowed. He was several times engaged in disputes with the Canterbury monks, necessitating the further interference of King Richard and of the Holy See. The prior, Norreys, whom he had nominated, was deposed; but his right to appoint the priors was acknowledged.

Baldwin acted as legate in Wales, where he held a visitation in 1187, and in 1188 preached the Crusade, after having himself taken, The cross on hearing the news of the loss of Jerusalem. In 1190 he set out for the Holy Land, in company with Hubert, Bishop of Salisbury, and others, providing at his own costs two hundred knights and three hundred retainers. While there he acted a vicegerent of the patriarch. Girdles Cambrensis describes he as gentle, kindly disposed, learned, and religious. He died during the siege of Acre, leaving all he possessed for the relief of the Holy Land and naming Bishop Hubert as his executor. His works (to be found in the "Bibliotheca Patrum Cisterciensium", V) are "De Commendiatione Fide"; "De Sacramento Altaris". There are also some discourses and a penitential in manuscript Preserved in the Lambeth Library.


Gervas of Canterbury, Chronicle, I; Giraldus Cambrensis, De Sex Episcop. Vit.; Idem, Itin. Kambriae Epp. Cantuar.; Gesta Regis Henrici; Introduction to Memorials of Richard I (all in Rolls Series).

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