Reformed Churchmen

We are Confessional Calvinists and a Prayer Book Church-people. In 2012, we remembered the 350th anniversary of the 1662 Book of Common Prayer; also, we remembered the 450th anniversary of John Jewel's sober, scholarly, and Reformed "An Apology of the Church of England." In 2013, we remembered the publication of the "Heidelberg Catechism" and the influence of Reformed theologians in England, including Heinrich Bullinger's Decades. For 2014: Tyndale's NT translation. For 2015, John Roger, Rowland Taylor and Bishop John Hooper's martyrdom, burned at the stakes. Books of the month. December 2014: Alan Jacob's "Book of Common Prayer" at: January 2015: A.F. Pollard's "Thomas Cranmer and the English Reformation: 1489-1556" at: February 2015: Jaspar Ridley's "Thomas Cranmer" at:

Friday, October 10, 2014

10 October 732 A.D. HAMMER STRATEGY: Charles Martel Hammers Islamo-Jihadi-Fascists at Tours

10 October 732 A.D.  HAMMER STRATEGY: Charles Martel Hammers Islamo-Jihadi-Fascists at Tours

Editors. “Battle of Tours.”  Encyclopedia Britannica. N.d.   Accessed 3 Oct 2014.

Battle of Tours, also called Battle of Poitiers ,  (October 732), victory won by Charles Martel, the de facto ruler of the Frankish kingdoms, over Muslim invaders from Spain. The battlefield cannot be exactly located, but it was fought somewhere between Tours and Poitiers, in what is now west-central France.

ʿAbd-ar-Ramān, the Muslim governor of Córdoba, had invaded Aquitaine (present southwestern France) and defeated its duke, Eudes. Eudes appealed for help to Charles, who stationed his forces to defend the city of Tours from the northward progress of the Muslims. According to tradition, the Muslim cavalry attacks broke upon Charles’s massed infantry, and after ʿAbd-ar-Ramān was killed in the fighting, the Arabs retired southward. There were no further Muslim invasions of Frankish territory, and Charles’s victory has often been regarded as decisive for world history, since it preserved western Europe from Muslim conquest and Islāmization. The victory also served to consolidate Charles’s leadership of the Franks, and he was able to assert his authority in Aquitaine, where Eudes swore allegiance to him.

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