Reformed Churchmen

We are Confessional Calvinists and a Prayer Book Church-people. In 2012, we remembered the 350th anniversary of the 1662 Book of Common Prayer; also, we remembered the 450th anniversary of John Jewel's sober, scholarly, and Reformed "An Apology of the Church of England." In 2013, we remembered the publication of the "Heidelberg Catechism" and the influence of Reformed theologians in England, including Heinrich Bullinger's Decades. For 2014: Tyndale's NT translation. For 2015, John Roger, Rowland Taylor and Bishop John Hooper's martyrdom, burned at the stakes. Books of the month. December 2014: Alan Jacob's "Book of Common Prayer" at: January 2015: A.F. Pollard's "Thomas Cranmer and the English Reformation: 1489-1556" at: February 2015: Jaspar Ridley's "Thomas Cranmer" at:

Sunday, December 21, 2014

21 December 882 A.D. Hincmar, Archbishop of Rheims & Councils of Quierzy—Semi-Pelagianizing the Bible & Augustine; Divine Foreknowledge; Free Will; Universalism; Repressor of Gottschalk, the Biblical Predestinarian & Augustinian

21 December 882 A.D.  Hincmar, Archbishop of Rheims & Councils of Quierzy—Semi-Pelagianizing the Bible & Augustine;  Divine Foreknowledge;  Free Will;  Universalism;  Repressor of Gottschalk, the Biblical Predestinarian & Augustinian

Weber, Nicholas. "Councils of Quierzy." The Catholic Encyclopedia. Vol. 12. New York: Robert Appleton Company, 1911.  Accessed 29 Oct 2014.

Councils of Quierzy

 (Kierzy, Carisiacum)

Several councils were held at Quierzy, a royal residence under the Carlovingians, but now an insignificant village on the Oise in the French Department of Aisne. The synod of September, 838, ordered the monks of Saint Calais in the Diocese of Le Mans to return to their monastery, from which they falsely claimed to have been expelled by their bishop. It also condemned some of the liturgical opinions of Amalarius of Metz. The two succeeding councils, held respectively in 849 and 853, dealt with Gottschalk and his peculiar teaching respecting predestination. The first of these meetings sentenced the recalcitrant monk to corporal castigation, deposition from the priestly office and imprisonment; his books were to be burned. At the second synod the famous four decrees or chapters (Capitula) drawn up by Hincmar on the predestination question were published. They asserted:

  • the predestination of some to salvation, and, in consequence of Divine foreknowledge, the doom of others to everlasting punishment;
  • the remedy for the evil tendencies of free will through grace;
  • the Divine intention of saving all men;
  • the fact of universal redemption.

The council held in February, 857, aimed at suppressing the disorders then so prevalent in the kingdom of Charles the Bald. The synod of 858 was attended by the bishops who remained loyal to Charles the Bald during the invasion of his dominions by Louis the German. It addressed a firm but conciliatory letter to the invader stating its attitude towards him for the intentions which he expressed, but which his actions belied.

No comments: