Reformed Churchmen

We are Confessional Calvinists and a Prayer Book Church-people. In 2012, we remembered the 350th anniversary of the 1662 Book of Common Prayer; also, we remembered the 450th anniversary of John Jewel's sober, scholarly, and Reformed "An Apology of the Church of England." In 2013, we remembered the publication of the "Heidelberg Catechism" and the influence of Reformed theologians in England, including Heinrich Bullinger's Decades. For 2014: Tyndale's NT translation. For 2015, John Roger, Rowland Taylor and Bishop John Hooper's martyrdom, burned at the stakes. Books of the month. December 2014: Alan Jacob's "Book of Common Prayer" at: January 2015: A.F. Pollard's "Thomas Cranmer and the English Reformation: 1489-1556" at: February 2015: Jaspar Ridley's "Thomas Cranmer" at:

Saturday, January 10, 2015

January 1495-1544 A.D. Melchior Hoffman—1st a Lutheran; Then, an Anabaptist Enthusiast & Apocalypsist—Predicted 2nd Return of Christ for 1533; Died in Prison

January 1495-1544 A.D.  Melchior Hoffman—1st a Lutheran;  Then, an Anabaptist Enthusiast & Apocalypsist—Predicted 2nd Return of Christ for 1533; Died in Prison

Editors. “Melchior Hofman.”  Encyclopedia Britannica.  8 Aug 2014.  Accessed 5 Dec 2014.

Melchior Hofmann, Hofmann also spelled Hoffmann (born c. 1495, Schwäbisch-Hall, Swabia [Germany]—died 1543/44, Strassburg [now Strasbourg, France]), German mystic and lay preacher noted for contributing a zealous eschatology to the religious doctrine of the Anabaptists, a Reformation movement that advocated adult baptism.

A furrier by trade, Hofmann worked as a Lutheran lay missionary in Livonia (modern Latvia and Estonia), Sweden, and northern Germany. His fervour made him a competitor of the educated clergy, and he was forced from Wolmar (now Valmiera, Latvia) in 1524 and from Dorpat (now Tartu, Estonia) in 1526. He preached to the German community in Stockholm for two years and later received an appointment as minister in Kiel (now in Germany) from Frederick I of Denmark.

At the colloquy in Flensburg (1529), Hofmann alarmed the Lutheran reformers by rejecting the Lutheran doctrine of the Eucharist, and he was consequently banned from Denmark. Converted to Anabaptism in Strassburg, he preached doctrines that went beyond both Lutheranism and Anabaptism; he stressed the eschatological aspects of Christian belief, predicting that the end of the world would occur in 1533 and that he would ride into Strassburg with Christ in the clouds to establish the New Jerusalem. Hofmann greatly influenced the development of Anabaptism in Münster, where a group of his Dutch followers took control in 1533. Their radical apocalypticism and persecution of their opponents, however, led to their destruction by the forces of the local margrave and exiled bishop of the city in 1535.

Traveling to the Netherlands in 1530, Hofmann won converts, who became known as Melchiorites; but upon his return to Strassburg (1533), where he was unpopular with the Anabaptists, he allowed himself to be arrested and imprisoned. Hofmann died in prison, his prophecy unfulfilled. For a short time afterward, Melchiorite groups persisted in Europe and England, but they eventually disappeared in the larger Anabaptist movement.

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